We use cookies on our website to make your experience better and to help us monitor and improve our customer service. If you continue without changing your settings we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies. You can manage the use of cookies through your browser. Read how we use cookies on our Privacy Policy page.

[skip to navigation]

You are here:

Dog Friendly in Cornwall

Summer in Cornwall

January 30, 2018 No Comments

 

I’ll be 40 this year and with a young family, I am often caught trying to emulate my magical childhood summers spent on beaches on the Helford River. Of all that I can remember of being little, these are by far the strongest recollections I have.

The smell of freshly caught mackerel cooking on a barbeque instantly transports me back to those long, light evenings on Grebe beach, where a group of friends and I would be skimming stones and clambering boundlessly on the rocks, while the adults would languish on rugs on the beach and sup on red wine and get that little bit louder as the evening went on.

My Mum, partner, brother, dogs and I would spend the afternoon slipping and sliding on the shingly beach, splashing about in the clear blue sea and relishing in each other’s company, with not a care in the world. As daylight fell a crowd would form, a bonfire would be lit and the delicious treats would start to be cooked. Oh how I still love now, to be under the starlit sky, with flip-flops, damp hair and a cosy sweater – with my skin glowing from the heat of the day.

What gives me most pleasure now though is to create these moments for my children (10 and 7), who in a digitally challenged world, are transported to the same off the grid world on the Helford, where there’s little mobile signal, limited 4G and the only things that matter are life’s simple pleasures and our beautiful, natural world.

A few crab lines and a pack of bacon provides hours of entertainment, whoops of delight and unadulterated joy for small people. Sure I remember grumbling as a child, about having to walk back up to the car, but I think that was more about not wanting the evening to end.

So here’s to many more warm beach days with our loved ones. Magic.

Exploring the Helford on foot

August 25, 2017 No Comments

Grebe beach - helford river - august 2016

Come rain or shine the Helford amplifies all the brilliance of a perfect Cornish walk.

This is the county’s coastal scenic splendour at its best. All routes are well-signed and lead to picture-perfect locations, whether woodland or by the water.

Tiny hamlets, time almost at a standstill, pebbly beaches and sandy shoreline, plus rockpools and rocky outcrops to explore. Shells and all manner of splendid distractions, it’s a feast for the eyes, picturesque and easy on the foot.

Take your time, stop, look and listen. You’ll see, hear and feel the natural beauty, the sweeping curves, the treeline edges of the Helford River and the glistening seascape. Calm or storm, there’s nothing to compare with a walk by the sea.

Fascinating houses in picturesque, ‘chocolate box’ villages like Durgan and wildlife in abundance. Tiny tracks and trails giving hints of the plentiful nocturnal activity.

Durgan.Helford.Cornwall-11

Sweeping to the shoreline, natural garden mixed with planted perfection of Trebah and Glendurgan.

And always a buzz, put-put of tiny boat engines, yachts and boats at anchor dotted about. In the creeks at higher tide all’s awash with hustle and bustle. Fish jumping, boats bobbing and waves lapping. Low tide brings its wealth of wonder too. Perfect for ‘Swallows and Amazons’ playtime as children skim stones and small dogs pant as barbecues sizzle at the waterside.

Mostly sheltered from the ravages of wind and tide, it’s an excellent place and space for on and off the water. There’s nothing like walking round then taking a boat trip to see the ‘other side’.

This is postcard-perfect Cornwall, where holiday memories are made. This makes all the things we have do to get here… worthwhile.

Here’s one of our favourite Helford River walks:

Mawnan Church to the Ferry Boat Inn, Helford Passage

Park at the pretty church at the end of Church Lane just outside the village of Mawnan Smith. From here walk through the kissing gate and into the sweeping field down towards the Helford River onto Parson’s Beach. A gentle stroll for about an hour along the coast path pass Porth Saxon, Grebe Rock and on to the tiny fishing village of Durgan, like stepping back in time. Carry on along the coastpath past Trebah Gardens and onto the Helford Passage.

Here, you can reward yourself at the family run Ferry Boat Inn. Take a seat in the pub’s outside terrace and enjoy homemade pub classics, whilst drinking in the view, ready for your return journey back.

View Helford River Cottages.

Save

Save

Save

A Winter Picnic with Cornish Maid

February 9, 2017 No Comments

Whether it’s the weekend or you are on holiday, nothing beats that feeling of not having to get up at the crack of dawn! After a lazy morning, it’s time to head out the door for some much-needed time in the great outdoors…

IMG_8131

Falmouth is close to the beaches and the countryside and offers endless things for a family to do whatever the weather. Today it’s time to go walking in one of our favourite spots: the Helford river.

 

Just a short drive from Falmouth is Mawnan Smith: a quiet, friendly village, complete with all the amenities you might need. Nestled within the heart of the village is a lovely, friendly cafe called ‘Cornish Maid’. It’s the perfect spot to sit and relax with a hot brew and piece of cake while watching the village comings and goings. They also make ready-to-go picnic hampers, which suited us perfectly today. We love nothing more than a hearty picnic, especially one that’s been lovingly prepared for us. A picnic in winter you might say? As long as you’re wrapped up with appropriate weather gear, you can enjoy it whatever the weather. Somehow food always seems to taste better al fresco and after a long walk, feels very much deserved!

IMG_8135

A short hop down the road by car, we park at Bosveal, ‘The National Trust’ car park.

We tog up: hats, scarves, gloves, baby slings and raincoats (always prepare for every weather eventuality in Cornwall!). Daddy has the picnic, I have the baby and the eldest little nipper has disappeared off into the woods to search for bears!

 

Off we stomp – through the woods, past the cows, down a well-trodden path until we reach our favourite destination: Grebe beach!  We timed it just right – low tide – so there was plenty of space to run around, throw stones, build a sand-castle and find a good spot to set up camp for the afternoon. The ten minute walk is perfect for little legs.

IMG_8146

After our beach fun it was time to re-fuel and tuck into our picnic: a delicious hamper full of tasty and satisfying treats! The family hamper, for 2 adults and 2 children, more than filled us up with its delicious selection of fresh vegetarian sandwiches, tasty homemade cakes and Cornish biscuits. It took away the hassle of having to pack a picnic and the kids loved the surprise of not knowing what was in the hamper!

IMG_8140

After our filling picnic, it was time to sit back and relax while the kids occupied themselves. It is such a wonderful place to just stop and totally immerse ourselves in nature; the rugged tree-lined coastline running parallel to fields of cows, the gentle lapping of water, seaweed-covered rock pools and hundreds of pretty shells and pebbles along the shoreline to keep the kids occupied. “Treasure Mummy!’”, my four-year-old excitedly exclaims, when he discovers some glistening sea glass by his feet.

IMG_8152

We had a lovely afternoon spent in a beautiful place. That’s the beauty of Cornwall – no matter what time of year, if you go exploring, you can always find a peaceful spot to escape to. Each season brings its own, unique sights, smells and sounds. During the summer the stunning beaches would have you believe you’re in the mediterranean. Come the quieter winter months, the rugged beauty of steel-grey seas and deserted wind-swept beaches never fail to impress!

 

 

Save

A foggy morning at Durgan, Helford River

January 3, 2017 No Comments

durgan-helford-river-december-9430 durgan-helford-river-december-9446 durgan-helford-river-december-9459 durgan-helford-river-december-9474 durgan-helford-river-december-9432

Bluebells at Calamansac

May 14, 2016 No Comments

One of our favourite times of year… the stunning display of Bluebells at Calamansac. The 50 acre estate on the Helford springs to life in May with incredible carpets of blue. Here are some photos from the estate from this week..

calamansac. helford river. cornwall.  (30 of 96) calamansac. helford river. cornwall.  (42 of 96) calamansac. helford river. cornwall.  (51 of 96) calamansac. helford river. cornwall.  (59 of 96) calamansac. helford river. cornwall.  (66 of 96)

Cottages with an outdoor shower

April 14, 2016 No Comments

 

The sun’s out, it’s a perfect day for the beach, but you only own one wetsuit. And it’s wet. Most probably because you spent yesterday playing in the surf and plan on spending tomorrow the same way. It’s a recurring problem for Cornish Holiday Cottages.

 

Dragging a cold, damp wetsuit over your limbs is not going to inspire a love of the sea in anyone. While us adults might be able to suck it up, children are definitely not going to be enamoured by a clammy neoprene clamour. A soggy wetsuit takes ages to wiggle into and immediately gives you the chills.

 

The other option is to have a family’s worth of wetsuits hanging up in the bathroom and a bath or shower full of sand underneath. Those wetsuits need a good rinsing after being in the sea to keep them at their best and the bath is a good place to give them a good dowsing – this does tend to lead to clogged drains though.

 

Of course, there are better places to prep your swim wear. In fact, the thought of all that outside inside, dirtying up the sinks and tiles will give some people nightmares; especially dragged through by tiny feet. But that shouldn’t let that temper your love of being outside and some of our holiday cottage owners feel exactly the same way, having created designated wetsuit washing, drying and storing.

Carrick Treath.Feock.Holiday home (41 of 75)

Carrick Treath is the perfect home for the water sport lover. It’s south facing bedrooms and dining room offer an unparalleled view of the glistening Carrick Roads. And at the bottom of the garden there’s Loe Beach and Loe Water Sports centre for all your sailing, kayaking and paddle boarding requirements. Back at the property there’s a wet room with a double shower for washing the beach from yourself and plenty of airy space to hang your suit.

image-153

Chy-An-Dour sits on the banks of the Helford Estuary and whether you’ve been surfing over on the north coast, or are scampering back from the river after a paddle , the heated outdoor shower will expunge the sand and salt from children, dogs or swimwear, before using the washing line to dry out your gear ready for tomorrow .

Roseladen Cottage. Falmouth. holiday (103 of 104)

Roseladen Cottage’s cosy living room and large kitchen make it the perfect spot for couples on a surfing holiday. Attached to the side of this idyllic farm cottage is an outdoor drying area with hooks for hanging wetsuits and space for dunking buckets, wellies and muddy leads. Set at the top of an idyllic country valley and a stone’s throw from Falmouth, you may find you spend so much time exploring what’s on your doorstep, you never actually make it up to the north coast.

primrose cottage.mawnan smith (130 of 140)

Primrose Cottage’s new porch includes an outdoor heated shower perfect for washing down you, your dog and your wetsuit. Just inside the porch you will then find the utility room with plenty of space to hang your wet gear up to dry for the next day. Then you can cuddle up by the Aga for a hot chocolate after your days adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

Porthtowan Minehouses

March 14, 2016 No Comments

1

You might find it hard to believe, but spring is just around the corner. Despite the mild chill that’s still in the air, we’ve already been taking advantage of the bright sunny days that are being sent our way. Last weekend, when the grey clouds lifted we took ourselves to Porthtowan, a small town nestled within some of the most stunning coastline that our fine county has to offer.

The remains of the mining industry dot the landscape as you drive towards Porthtowan. Like scars on the landscape, chimneys stand like bare trees on the hillsides. It’s an area steeped in mining heritage.

 

Porthtowan itself fighting against the tumbling dunes that continually blow through the town. As we got closer to the car park we found half the road and pavement completely covered with sand. It’s all part of its charm.

2

On the beach families and dog walkers stretched their legs and splashed around in the sand.
But our mission wasn’t to stroll on the beach. We we’re heading East, up the steep assent from the beach and onto the coastal path.

4
As we came to the brow of the next headland and stood high above Chapel Porth beach, the reason for our visit made itself known above.
The remains of Wheal Coates, or more accurately Towanroath engine house, will be familiar as the image that graces a thousand postcards, but nothing beats the real thing.
Wheal Coates mine was opened in 1802 and miners worked in its tunnels up to 1889. Towanroath Engine House was built in 1872 to drain the seeping sea water from the 600 feet deep mine shaft.
What if this was the view from your work window?
In reality, the 138 men of the mine were working in tough conditions. The fragile mineshafts extended far beyond the shore line. As storms raged, miners could hear huge boulders being dragged across the seabed which was only feet above their heads.

5
Next, we took a short scramble up the hill to two more engine houses: the Stamps and Whim engine houses. They were used to hoist and crush tin ore from the shaft below. As you walk around this site the remains of an old boiler pond can be seen. There’s also a calciner, where the ore was roasted at hight temperatures to drive out impurities – in this case arsenic.
11

As we turned around to head back to Porthtowan we caught sight of the ocean spray rising over the coastline (and met a friendly dog bounding towards us.
On our return we tumbled into Porthtowan’s famous Blue Bar for a much needed refreshment. Roll on the rest of spring!

 

11 reasons to visit the beach in winter

February 11, 2016 1 Comment

Maenporth beach Falmouth-1

In winter the beach becomes a completely different environment. It becomes a great empty playground for those who enjoy cool winds and long walks. You may not be up for a swim but many of the joys of the coast are even better over the winter months, due to the lack of crowds. There are loads of reasons the winter beach is the best beach: these are just the first ones that came to mind here at Cornish Holiday Cottages..

1. The heavy winter surf
There’s nothing like the fearsome roll of the waves in the winter months. The giant swells of Porthleven during stormy weather are one of nature’s greatest spectacles, safe from a vantage point high up on the beach you can see the waves crashing over the pier and sea wall.. It’s a simply stunning experience.

2. The beach is deserted
The beach in winter means no fighting for a good spot on the sand, no sunglasses, no sunburn…it’s a completely different experience. And the best part? More often than not you have a whole stretch of beach to yourselves, so your children can run wild and you can see where they are from any vantage point.

3. Go shell collecting.
When the beach is deserted of people and the waves have been pulling up shells from the the depths of the shoreline, there’s a huge variety of new shells and sea debris to discover. Children will come back with vast swathes of potential artefacts for beachy art projects.

4. The perfect photo opportunity
You can take some amazing photos of the family. It will be less crowded and easier to take some really nice landscape shots. Kids and dogs have space to be themselves and the fact that you are one of the few people on the beach will mean that your photos are not full of sunbathers turning lobster red.

5. Drink a hot chocolate
Sitting outside a beach cafe, your hands curled around the warmth of a cream topped hot chocolate is one of the simple pleasures in life. After a windswept coastal walk.

6. Enjoy the view, eating fish and chips
Just like the warming sensation of a hot chocolate, steaming hot fish and chips are best enjoyed perched on the sand dunes, accompanied by the roar of the ocean. If it’s too cold, they’re just as great munched down inside the car, still watching the beach.

7. Beachcombing
Everything natural on the beach tells a story – so this is a great way to entertain children on a winter weekend, helping them to uncover the secrets of these botanical playgrounds, and understand more about our island’s marine heritage.

8. Getting windswept
The wind is perfect for blowing the cobwebs away after a luxurious lunch. But it’s also great for kite flying. Inevitably though, someone is bound to get wet if they get too near the surf, so bring a spare pair of clothes.

8. Birdwatching
The lack of humans also attracts types of wildlife that rarely risk the crowded beaches of summer. So maybe bring the binoculars.

10. A winter picnic
Wrap up warm, bring a flask of hot chocolate and maybe a portable BBQ to have an unseasonable hot dog. Remember to pack a blanket with a waterproof backing though.

11. Let the dog run free
A lot of beaches don’t allow dogs on them during the summer months, so winter is their time to roam free. Your dog will love running up and down the vast expanses of sand, darting in and out of the surf. It’s play time.

Living On The Beach

February 9, 2016 1 Comment

maenporth

There are many perks to Cornish living, but none are as evocative as the pull of the ocean. People travel here, move here or stay here to be as close to the beach as possible. And for most, even those of us that live here, we get the opportunity to actually plonk our houses within a stone’s throw of the beach. And there’s nothing like having the beach on your doorstep.

Even as we write this, in the post-Christmas wait for spring, we still love the beach. Wrapping up and taking a stroll along a deserted beach is a uniquely invigorating experience.

There’s no excuse to be bored either. Ever. The beach is an adventure playground for children and even if you’re just sitting on the beach, that’s a perfectly fine way of whiling away the hours.

Living by the beach awakens all the senses: there’s nothing like the sound of lapping waves. As you’re lying in bed with the window open, the reassuring sound will soothe you to sleep, it’ll be there to accompany you as you have a lazy morning coffee and it’ll be a soothing soundtrack to reading a novel in the afternoon. There’s also no better smell than fresh, salty sea air. It’s air that has been cleansed by miles of ocean, instead of towns, cities and A roads. And even if you stayed with us for a month or more, you’d never get tired of the sunsets and sunrises painting the sky different shades of pink, purple and orange, or of looking at the deep blue sea melt into the horizon.

Our cottages are all self-catering. It seems a bizarre thing to mention in a post about the beach, but what better kitchen to have than the beach itself. Every day can be a barbeque day, and with a little creativity, you can still get those greens in.

That’s why we at Cornish Holiday Cottages feel privileged to be able to offer you some fine self-catering holiday homes only a hop, skip and a jump from sandy shores. Below is just a sample of our Cornish beach side cottages.

ext

Little Nest
Little Nest is a romantic cottage for two perched on the edge of Maenporth beach. Despite its generous views of the beach and its open plan living space, it is a snug and well insulated cottage, even in winter. A fantastic romantic retreat after skimming stones, rock pooling or sauntering along the coastline.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Carrick Treath
Sitting at the northern end of the Carrick Roads and boasting luxurious furnishings and ample space, Carrick Treath is perfect for large groups. If you choose the right room you can even wake with the ocean just beyond your toes. Otherwise there’s the floor to ceiling windows of the living area to admire the view of Loe Beach from.

falmouth.Holiday.cottage.helford.ridifarne-2609

Ridifarne
Perched just above the beach at Helford Passage, Ridifarne is a large home that sleeps eight in its four expansive bedrooms. It’s less than a minute from a beach just perfect for launching kayaks and rowing boats from.

Durgan.Helford.Cornwall-17

Chy-An-Dour and Rose Cottages 1, 2 and 3
We love being able to offer four seperate cottages in the tiny fishing hamlet of Durgan. They are all cottages that would have been owned by working fishing families who would have dragged their boats onto the shore and practically up to their front doors. Chy-An-Dour is a large, recently refurbished cottage with open beamed ceilings and plenty of character, whilst the 3 Rose Cottages, built in an L shape, all ooze old Cornish charm and are perfect for dog loving families.

Guest blogger Mingo – How to behave on a photo shoot

January 18, 2016 1 Comment

I have had a busy week, with walks on the beach, chasing the post man, and I modelled in a CHC photo shoot for a brand new holiday cottage coming soon. It’s not easy being a model; sitting still, looking at the camera, keeping out of the way, not things that come naturally for a Jack Russell. Anyway I thought I would put together some top tips for any other models out there dreaming of their ‘big break’…

 

  1. roscarrack vean. holiday. falmouth (60 of 227)
  2. One – Make sure your beard is all going in one direction, there should be a human on hand to help with this, if not bark a few times and someone should come running (you are the star after all).
  3. roscarrack vean. holiday. falmouth (77 of 227)
  4. TwoPerfect the art of lying down, a bit like Derek Zoolander it’s good to have a few different lying down positions under your belt. I call this one ‘Long Legs’.
  5. roscarrack vean. holiday. falmouth (100 of 227)
  6. ThreeEat on demand, its a hard job but somebody has got to do it.
  7. roscarrack vean. holiday. falmouth (58 of 227)
  8. FourThe art of sitting, it’s not about comfort, here it is about looking good.

 

Well, I hope that has helped create a few budding stars, it seems I may be roped into a few more of these shoots so watch this space! I have also rather enjoyed the spotlight here on the blog, if you’re lucky I will tell you about my favourite local dog friendly pub next!

Adios Amigos

Mingo x

 

« Older Entries