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Literary Cornwall

Daphne Du Maurier’s Cornwall

August 25, 2020 No Comments
Du Maurier and family at Menabilly (Getty Images)

Much like visitors coming to Cornwall on holiday, Daphne Du Maurier retreated from London society to the landscape of Cornwall. It’s here that she would spend time with simpler pursuits, writing, fishing and sailing – free of the pressures and expectations that came from her life in the city.

Honeymooning in a cottage on the Helford River at Frenchman’s Creek (the setting that would later inspire the novel of the same name) Du Maurier’s love of Cornwall was all-encompassing. The Helford River is the perfect place to be immersed in the countryside that so inspired her writing.

You can tread the steps Du Maurier once paced easily from your holiday cottage, taking the ferry from Helford Passage over to Helford Village, following the coast path up Frenchman’s Creek to the cottage where she stayed. Here it’s easy to understand the magic and intrigue that this place once held and still continues to hold within the imagination. Frenchman’s Creek remains one of the quietest parts of Cornwall, with the tide lapping against the dense woodland that lines the creek you’d be forgiven for thinking that Du Maurier herself might just wander around the corner.

Frenchman’s Creek

Another place nearby, and one of many great Cornish houses that can lay claim to having some part to play in the inspiration for ‘Manderley’ in Du Maurier’s novel ‘Rebecca’ is Trelowarren. Rumour has it that after a muddy walk through the woods and fields alongside the Helford River, Du Maurier and her party were refused entry by staff who mistook them for travelling vagabonds. Du Maurier would later describe Trelowarren and it’s long sweeping drive amongst oak trees as ‘the most beautiful place imaginable’ in a letter, so it’s safe to assume that she must have returned later on in a slightly more presentable state and had a look around…

‘Rebecca’ is likely to be Du Maurier’s most memorable work, having never gone out of print since it was first published back in 1938 and selling over 2.8 million copies between then and 1965- a number likely to have quadrupled in the years since. Soon to be on the small screen is a Netflix adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier’s iconic ‘Rebecca’ starring Hollywood A-Listers Lily James and Armie Hammer.

Menabilly, the Country House that Du Maurier restored from a dilapidated state in Fowey and lived in is another fine house likely to have influenced the ‘Manderley’ of her imagination. Ivy covered and only visible from the water, with an ‘eerie and most ghostlike atmosphere’, Du Maurier would trespass here and pace the empty hallways and rooms for years before finally taking on the lease. Her relationship to Fowey is intimate and easily understood when you pause for a moment at it’s romantic and picturesque harbour.

A pensive Daphne Du Maurier

Familiar to all of our guests must be the iconic Jamaica Inn, which can be seen towering over the moorland on the journey down along the A30. The scene for the novel of the same name, the inn still operates as a pub, and recently harboured stranded drivers during a snowstorm. Jamaica Inn is a dark tale that references the smuggling past of Cornwall, now known for beaches rather than pirates. Nevertheless, Jamaica Inn is an important work which uses the setting of rugged moorland to great effect. Jamaica Inn was recently adapted into a 3-part series by the BBC starring Jessica Brown-Findlay, so readers and non-readers alike can absorb themselves into this story.

Visit Cornwall from the comfort of your sofa (or chaise…) by ordering a book set in Cornwall from The Falmouth Bookseller.

Visit the real Poldark country

June 6, 2018 No Comments

The popular BBC1 show, Poldark, returns to our screens this Sunday, 10th June at 9pm.  The series showcases some of Cornwall’s most spectacular rugged landscapes, stunning beaches and historic buildings.

If it’s just too tempting and you feel the yearn to follow in Ross and Demelza’s footsteps, firstly call our friendly team to help you find the perfect base for your break, then read on for our handy list of beautiful filming locations and must-see attractions to visit during your holiday.

 

Botallack Mine – Wheal Owles, on the Tin Coast, near St Just

The abandoned buildings, owned by the National Trust, were the perfect location for the Poldark family mines. The ruined engines houses, part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage site, are set on the side on the cliff with breath-taking views.

Read more at the National Trust website/Botallack.

 

Charlestown Harbour, St Austell

Built in 1792 by Charles Rashleigh, Charlestown is still a working harbour for china clay exports. Now privately owned the port has been used in well over one hundred shows and films. It’s just like stepping back in time as you walk along the flagstones and explore the 1939 Tall Ship “Kajsamaoor”.

Read more at Charlestown Port

 

 

Wheal Coates, St Agnes Head

Wheal Coates Engine House is perched on the side of the cliff at St Agnes over looking Chapel Porth. This is Poldark country at its best with purple heather, yellow gorse and miles of ocean.

Visit Wheal Coates’ National Trust website

 

Bodmin Moor

A great place to stop on your way to Falmouth. Used as the location for Ross Poldark’s cottage, Nampara, and the dramatic horseback scenes.

Read all the Poldark filming locations at the BBC website.

 

 

 

Poldark Tin Mine, Wendron, Helston

Although the Poldark Mine has not featured in the current series it was seen by millions all over the world when it featured in in the original BBC drama in 1970s. The only complete tin mine open for underground guided tours for a real atmosphere of times gone by.

Opening times and prices are available on the Poldark Mine website.

 

Filming for Rosamunde Pilcher at Trengwainton Garden

July 20, 2015 No Comments

WP_20150719_003 WP_20150719_005 WP_20150719_006 WP_20150719_008Debbie had a lovely surprise this week when she went to visit Trengwainton Gardens near Penzance and they were filming for Rosamunde Pilcher in the grounds. At least they had some brilliant Cornish sunshine all weekend.