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Days out

Dolphins in Falmouth Bay with August Rock Adventures

October 12, 2020 No Comments
A dolphin swims alongside the boat in Falmouth Bay

August Rock Adventures offer charter boat tours of the Helford River and Falmouth Area, and offer bespoke tours as far away as the Scilly Isles. In late September some of the CHC team were lucky enough to be taken on a tour of Falmouth Bay by rib. Read on to hear all about our exciting morning at sea.

We set off on the morning of the Autumn equinox and have arranged to meet our Skipper Iain on the pontoon at Helford Passage. It’s early enough in the day for the quietness that covers the Helford River to still be in place, and whisps of morning mist still cling to the surface of the water.

A friendly wave from a rib weaving through the moorings announces the arrival of our boat, Harbinger. After hopping in we don our lifejackets and run through a safety briefing. We’re faced with two options for our trip, one heads towards Falmouth for an exploration of the harbour, another takes us out to sea in search of dolphins. With two ten-year olds (and two very excited grown-ups) aboard there’s no question- so it is out to sea we go…

We make our way towards an oil tanker anchored out in the bay. These tankers are a common sight at the edge of the horizon, often seen from the seafront in Falmouth, so getting up close and seeing the scale was fascinating. As we pass along, Iain tells us the meaning of the term ‘Falmouth for Orders’ whereby large ships wait in Falmouth Bay for fluctuations in the price of their cargo or for instructions of where in the world to head out to next.

Flashes of white on the surface of the water beside the tanker are revealed to be gannets, huge birds which spear fish from the skies at speeds of up to 60mph. They swoop past the boat, giving us a close-up view of their blue bills whilst Iain regales us with snippets of insight into the wildlife of the bay. Iain lives alongside the Helford River and knows how to expertly navigate the area.

It isn’t long, however, before something else distracts us from the tankers and the gannets. Fins break through the surface of the water up ahead, and we spot what we’ve all been looking for. Hearts aflutter with excitement, we’re joined at sea by a pod of dolphins!

There’s a code of conduct for watching marine life in this way, which Iain at August Rock respects and adheres to like a true sea-going gentleman. One must never follow a pod of Dolphins, but simply pass on by. If the dolphins show interest, they’ll likely swim beside the boat to ride the bow-wave. If the dolphins do not deviate from their route, it’s safe to assume they have somewhere important to be, and are best left to it.

Luckily for us the pod that we come across are feeling friendly, and take a keen interest in us. They race alongside us to leap from the water inches away from the boat, and at times there are so many of them that our necks swivel at a dizzying speed to see as many as possible. These harbour dolphins are smaller than their bottle-nosed relatives. Their bellies are coloured a beautiful taupe, which we can see beneath the surface of the water as they corkscrew alongside us.

As one pod disperses, another one take it’s place, and we spend 40 minutes in awe by the amazing show provided by nature. We all talk about how aligned with the environment we feel, and how precious and memorable this moment is. In time, the fins become fewer and further between and the dolphins, no doubt distracted by some other source of amusement, part ways from the wake of Harbinger, into the horizon.

And with that, we whizz along towards the Lizard – in search of more adventure. Before long we pass the Manacles, a rocky outcrop just below the water made famous by worried sailors eager to avoid it when navigating the waters into Falmouth Bay. Although no match for modern GPS (which Harbinger is well-equipped with) the yellow buoy which marks the rocks tolls a bell, beautiful and haunting in equal measure as it hits its note with each rolling wave.

Coverack as seen from the boat

As we race across the coast we spot Mussel Farms, sea-salt pumping stations, and the harbour town of Coverack sitting idyllically against the sea in a flush of white painted cottages with thatched roofs.

We pull into a cove and note how the texture of the landscape has changed from the soft greeness of the Helford River to something entirely more wild, and ripe for exploration from the water. On a warmer day, Iain explains, we might have been able to take to the water from the boat and had a moment of wild swimming in total seclusion. With the dolphins just out in the bay there’s surely nowhere else to swim that would make you feel so connected to the world around you.

Making our way back to dry land after two-hours of fun, a calm point towards the horizon from Iain indicates what might just be the most thrilling part of the journey. A blowhole breaks the surface up ahead as a fin whale comes up for air. We spot it around four times, at five-or-so-minute intervals as the whale takes deep breaths and journeys below the surface.

Two very excited little girls, and two equally enthralled grown ups land at Helford Passage almost entirely speechless- two hours on the water felt like deliverance into an entirely different world. A world beneath the waves, seen from the land and heard about, but which never quite seemed real until a morning spent out on the water with August Rock Adventures.

Our Skipper Iain of August Rock Adventures at the helm of Harbinger

Visit augustrockadventures.co.uk to book your own adventure on Falmouth Bay.

Secret Cornish Gardens

August 25, 2020 No Comments
Beneath the Gunnera at Trebah

The famously mild Cornish climate allows plant life more familiar with the sub-tropical to thrive on British soil. So renowned, some Cornish gardens are household names. Once presumed lost to the annals of time, The Lost Gardens of Heligan were rediscovered and restored to glory. The Eden Project, built into a disused quarry is world famous for the extraordinary biomes.

Whilst The Eden Project & The Lost Gardens of Heligan make for a brilliant day out, it’s the secret gardens that delight the budding botanist within us. These lesser known slices of paradise, away from it all, make discovering them something to whisper about. Below we have listed a few of these, but let us know if you’ve discovered a new favourite garden on your travels through Cornwall.

Lamorran Gardens

From Falmouth a boat trip to St Mawes leads to Lamorran Gardens, one of the best-kept secret gardens in Cornwall. The terraced Italianate garden where views of the sea are framed by Corinthian columns transports you to the Mediterranean.

Enys Gardens

Tucked away just outside of Penryn, a visit to Enys Gardens during the spring is unforgettable. A carpet of Bluebells surrounds an old manor house with charm and mystery in abundance. At Enys, landscaped grounds extend into a woodland that becomes wilder and more magical with each and every step.

Tremenheere Sculpture Garden

Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens

The natural and creative worlds converge at Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens just outside Penzance. Wander through acres of landscape dotted with immersive works by artists such as James Tyrell and Richard Woods, admiring beautiful plants as you go before stopping off at the cafe serving brilliant food.

The National Dahlia Collection

En-route to Tremenheere you pass the National Dahlia Collection– where you can roam through hundreds of varieties of this special plant, often without another soul to be seen. See everything from the trendy Cafe au Lait Dahlia to pom-pom varieties.

Trebah Garden

Trebah Garden on the Helford River might not be such a secret garden thanks to a recent feature in Vogue Magazine, but it’s our favourite. The way the garden winds down to a private sandy beach immersing you in the sub-tropical flora is almost mesmerising. Trebah features in our short video clip below- where you can see just some of the magic to be found there.

Properties in our portfolio for garden lovers;

The Coach House in Mawnan is set within established gardens of a beautiful country house beside the Helford River.

The Calamansac Estate in Port Navas is set within 50 acres of grounds, carpeted with Bluebells and Anenomes in the spring.

Gwel an Dowr in Polwheveral Creek opens out onto a rose garden.

A winter evening in Durgan on the Helford River

January 20, 2020 No Comments

As a winters day draws to a close, a hush envelops the Helford. The only sounds are those of waves rocking pebbles on the shore and a cormorant splashing as he catches dinner in the last of the light.

All year round, the hamlet of Durgan on the Helford River has an enchanting draw- nestled as it is against the water, cocooned by woodland. Durgan was originally a collection of fisherman’s cottages, and protected from over development by the hard work of the National Trust, it timelessly remains one of the most idyllic waterside villages in Cornwall with just 17 properties.

Guests staying at our cottages in Durgan often regale us with stories of swims before bed or of taking their morning coffee down to the water, enjoying the peace and quiet before the day ahead.

Upriver from Durgan you’ll find the villages of Helford Passage and Helford, along with various inlets and creeks like Frenchman’s Creek, made famous by Daphne Du Maurier in her novel of the same name.

On a clear evening the crisp light that you only see in winter makes marvels out of the everyday, and even things like lobster-pots become beautiful. The waters of the Helford River run clear even in the winter.

The occasional walker will pass by with a nod and a smile as if to say ‘we are both here, both so lucky’… and aren’t we just.

Holidays on the Helford River are inspiring and rejuvenating all year round. To see our cottages in Durgan, click here and start planning your holiday to this beautiful and secluded part of Cornwall.

2020 Bank Holidays in Cornwall

January 10, 2020 No Comments
Children and a dog running through the woods at the Calamansac Estate in Cornwall on the Helford River near Falmouth.

We’re all back into the swing of things after the Christmas holidays and coming around to the idea of it being a whole new decade. One of the lovely things about early January (when our New Year’s resolutions are still clear in our minds) is looking forward to what the year ahead will bring. Spring lies just around the corner and 2020 is set to be one very exciting year!

For many of us filling in our new calendars, we’ll be jotting down dates and starting to get excited about the many bank holidays coming up in the New Year. There are eight bank holidays in England and Wales this year, and those planning a holiday to Cornwall might want to think about booking over a bank holiday weekend to take advantage of an extra day without taking away from their annual leave.

In Cornwall, the bank holidays often mean getting outdoors and a day on the beach might be just the thing we need.

During the Easter weekend we can start to see Cornwall beginning to blossom, and in May the two bank holidays serve as a taste of the long summer holidays that lie ahead. Our bank holidays offer precious time to wind down with loved ones and enjoy some adventure time.

Visitors to Cornwall for the early May Bank Holiday, which takes place on a Friday this year, will enjoy the fact that it falls on Helston Flora Day. This dancing festival dates to pre-Christian times as a way to welcome in the summer. Dancers line the streets and even dance in and out of houses!

Falmouth’s Fal River Festival falls this year upon the late May Spring Bank Holiday. This ten-day celebration is a community festival with over 150 events varying from the Arts to gig racing.

See below a list of UK Bank Holidays for 2020, and start planning your holiday in Cornwall!

  • 1st January 2020 – New Years Day
  • 10th April 2020 – Good Friday
  • 13th April 2020 – Easter Monday
  • 8th May 2020 – Early May Bank Holiday (VE Day)
  • 25th May 2020 – Spring Bank Holiday
  • 31st August 2020 – Summer Bank Holiday
  • 25th December 2020 – Christmas Day
  • 28th December 2020 – Boxing Day (substitute day)

Whilst you have your calendars and diaries are open, make a note of these other key dates in the Cornish Calendar, and plan your holiday accordingly!

  • Valentine’s Day: Thursday 14 February 
  • St Piran’s Day: Thursday 5 March
  • St Patrick’s Day: Sunday 17 March
  • Mothering Sunday: Sunday 31 March
  • St George’s Day: Tuesday 23 April
  • Father’s Day: Sunday 16 June
  • Halloween: Thursday 31 October 
  • Bonfire Night: Tuesday 5 November

Things to do in Cornwall this Winter

December 14, 2019 No Comments
An early morning scene from Swanpool Beach of people walking. Pendennis Castle and St Anthony lighthouse appear in the background through sea-mist.
A winter walk in Falmouth.

Oh Cornwall! Famed for sandy beaches and temperate climate. We’re all familiar with visions and memories of Cornwall during the summer, but in winter when the crowds disperse there’s a magic to the landscape. We’re in love with Cornwall whatever the weather, so read on below for our list of the very best things to do in Cornwall this winter.

1.Walks

Cornish folk spend a lot of their time on their feet during the winter, and with the South-West coast path offering over 300 miles of coastline to explore it’s no wonder why! Hike some clifftop walks on the north coast, or visit the calm and sheltered banks of the Helford River.

2. Tate St Ives

Wandering around the newly refurbished Tate St Ives will allow you to look at the Cornish landscape with fresh eyes. The perfect day out for a rainy day in Cornwall. Drink a hot chocolate on the top floor and enjoy wintry views of the sea over the rooftops stretching out towards Godrevy.

3. The Eden Project

Make use of the ice-skating rink at The Eden Project before warming up in the sub-tropical biome. There are few better ways to escape the chill in Cornwall this winter!

4. National Maritime Museum Cornwall

Explore Cornwall from the comfort of this incredible museum in Falmouth, with exhibits on all things maritime certain to delight anyone with even a passing interest in boats.

5. Visit a famous Cornish garden

The famous Cornish Gardens of Trebah, and the Lost Gardens of Heligan are wonderful for crisp winter walks in Cornwall. Get lost among the plant life and wonder at what can grow in Cornwall during the winter months.

6. Go storm watching at Porthleven

Images of Portleven make the news at least once each winter, as storms roll in and batter the harbour side in the most dramatic fashion. Watching the waves from the safety of one of the cosy pubs is a firm favourite pastime of ours during the winter, one of our favourite things to do in Cornwall just gets even better when the weather is really wet and windy.

7. Visit the Minack Theatre

Sitting outside in the winter to watch a play might not sound like one of the best things to do in Cornwall this winter, but The Minack is not your normal theatre! Hewn from the cliffs above Porthcurno especially for a performance of ‘The Tempest’, it’s worth a visit even if there’s nothing playing.

8. Have a hot chocolate taste test

With a thriving coffee and cafe scene, we’ve set ourselves the challenge of tasting every hot chocolate in the county. Whilst our final verdict is not yet in, we can say that they always seem to taste better with a great view! Try Gylly Beach Cafe in Falmouth, or The Unicorn in Porthtowan.

9. Go swimming

Whilst swimming in the sea might be out, Ships and Castles in Falmouth offer a great fun way to get into the water.

10. Watch a film at an independent cinema

The Poly in Falmouth plays a range of movies from old classics to new ones. Visit the Newlyn Film House on your way home after an afternoon in Mousehole.

11. Take a scenic drive

When it’s a bit too windy for a clifftop walk, seeing the dramatic scenery from the road is the second-best thing. Journey from St Ives to St Just along the B3306, stopping off at the Gurnard’s Head for lunch.

12. Visit a country house

Often decked out for Christmas, step into a vision of Cornwall past by visiting a country house. Trelissick and Godolphin are two of the best, looked after by the National Trust. A visit to St Michael’s Mount is an unforgettable experience at any time of year.

Ideas for dog friendly days out in Cornwall

June 21, 2019 No Comments

The Falmouth and Helford River area of Cornwall is the perfect place for a day out with your dog and these tips are bound to get tails wagging. In celebration of today being ‘bring your dog to work day’, we’re championing everyday as bring your dog on holiday day! With over 50 dog-friendly properties in the portfolio of Cornish Holiday Cottages and with our resident doggy experts on duty, we’re well qualified to advise you on the very best days out with you and your beloved pet in Cornwall!

Beaches

We are spoilt for choice with beautiful beaches in Cornwall. Long stretches of golden sand with clear waters line the coast. But come the summer, many of them become off limits to our hairy companions.

Luckily, the waters of the Helford are full of little coves and beaches which are dog-friendly all year round. You and your dog can scamper to your hearts content along the 2,000 foot long stretch of sand at Prisk Cove, or the sheltered cove of Port Saxon. Grebe Beach near Mawnan Smith is perfect for a spot of sunbathing, and for a swim with your pet.

Pubs

We Cornish folk have a soft spot for our dogs and our pubs, so we love being able to combine the two with the welcoming dog-friendly places to eat and drink in Cornwall. We love the Pandora Inn outside Mylor near Falmouth, where dogs are welcome to sit outside with owners on a pontoon stretching out onto the water.
The Ferryboat on the banks of the River Helford in the village of Helford Passage is another marvelous option for drinking and dining with your dog in tow. Dogs are allowed inside and outside of the restaurant.
If looking out onto the ocean and the beautiful Gyllyngvase beach in Falmouth at sunset appeals, dinner on the terrace at the award winning Gylly Beach café is an absolute must. With outdoor heating and blankets on standby, it’s cosy for everyone even as dusk settles and the moon rises over the ocean.

Walks

The South West coast path. Need we say a single word more? So much of beautiful Cornwall is accessible to walkers via the footpath that hugs the coastline, taking in all of what makes this part of the world truly magic. Walk with your dog along the Roseland Heritage Coast for wonderful views of the sea, or along the Lizard peninsular for dramatic cliffs. The Penwith Heritage Coast provides all the drama and mystery of Poldark country. Not to mention the gentle lanes and pretty paths that criss-cross all along the Helford and Falmouth area. You and your dog will find that there is so much scenery to explore, you’ll simply have to come back year after year to see it all!

Shopping

Sometimes we just need a bit of retail therapy. Here is where the harbourside market town of Falmouth comes into its own. A farmers market on Falmouth Moor every Tuesday, and a market on a Saturday provide ample opportunity. Browse for music at Jam in Falmouth, or search through tomes for a ‘tail’ to read at the dog-friendly Beerwolf Books.

On the Water

Visitors come from far and wide to Cornwall in order to delight in being on the water. With ferries to get from A to B in leisurely style or for a scenic sightseeing trip with your dog, catch one of the many boats departing from Falmouth pier. Perhaps you’ll be bound for a beautiful trip up the Helford river, or set for a lovely day out in beautiful St Mawes for ice cream and fish and chips.

Attractions

Trelissick House and Garden is a dream day out for dogs and owners. Whilst our four-legged friends might not be permitted within the main House and Gardens of this spectacular historical estate on the banks of the River Fal just outside of Falmouth, there are dog walking opportunities aplenty in the acres and acres of historical woodland and meadows. After a scamper around, the wonderful courtyard café has sheltered seating outdoors for you and your best friend to enjoy a cream tea.
The Cornish Seal Sanctuary on the Helford in Gweek allows dogs on leads, so curious pooches can finally get a glimpse of the marine life within the blue waters of the Cornish coast.
Pendennis Castle in Falmouth is run by English Heritage, and allows dogs on leads both indoors and outdoors. With exhibitions on the Tudor history of Cornwall, along with fascinating insights into our maritime past. Great views are to be found from over the battlements to Falmouth bay and the mouth of the river Fal (smaller dogs might need to be picked up to appreciate the views!)

We hope this gives you some idea of just a few wonderful things you and your dog can get up to on your holiday in Cornwall. Don’t forget to browse our pet friendly properties to find a place to snuggle up after your busy days out!

Canine escapades in dog-friendly Falmouth

March 1, 2019 No Comments

Loyal and ever present, my boys and I venture into Falmouth town several times a week to run errands, grab a coffee (me not them) and do some shopping.

Mostly we go the ‘long way round’ and head to Gyllyngvase Beach for a scamper on the beach (them not me – although it has been known!) and we meander our way across the rocks at low tide to Castle Beach. Marvin likes to chase the birds, although at only five months old his lack of sure foot means he some times ends up submerged in a rock pool! Mingo, the Spanish street dog rescue, now aged 6, stays close and together we navigate the textures and variances of the rock below us. What is it that is so satisfying and life affirming about clambering the rocks on low tide? Is it that the ebb and flow of the tide uncovers delights each time it does its thing, or that there’s only a certain window in each 24 hours where access is possible and the knowledge that in just a few hours, all will be at one with the sea again.  Whatever it is we are there, breathing in the essence of the sea and the life force energy.

From Castle Beach we head back along the road a little, passing Port Pendennis Harbour village and the Events Square at Discovery Quay, also the home of the National Maritime Museum Cornwall. First stop has to be Espressini for what is undoubtedly the best ‘Flat White’ Falmouth has to offer. (For convenience there is an Espressini at either end of town). I perch on a high stool in the window, with the former, iconic Harbour Commissioners building opposite. Now a pizza/pie/cider restaurant, The Stable; here you and your four legged can delight in some carbs (or a salad if you must) on the ground floor and adjacent to the harbour and Customs House Quay. 

Nearly every trip to Falmouth includes grabbing some provisions from the Natural Store. Organic fruit and vegetables, delicious yoghurts, vegetarian delights and the best chocolate selection in town means I often come out with more than I intended. Mingo and Marvin reside on the front step outside tethered to the dog hook. As I tie them up I pray a postman won’t pass!

Lunch plays out at Good Vibes; Daniel Rossiter and his partner Jade make a brilliant duo. Daniel creates nutritious culinary delights and is always pushing the boundaries with the vegan and gluten free options. Mingo and Marv munch on a homemade doggy biscuit under the table, on high alert for any other scraps that might follow.

As we walk, we meet and greet many, such is the world of dog lovers and friendly Falmouth folk.

Visit the real Poldark country

June 6, 2018 No Comments

The popular BBC1 show, Poldark, returns to our screens this Sunday, 10th June at 9pm.  The series showcases some of Cornwall’s most spectacular rugged landscapes, stunning beaches and historic buildings.

If it’s just too tempting and you feel the yearn to follow in Ross and Demelza’s footsteps, firstly call our friendly team to help you find the perfect base for your break, then read on for our handy list of beautiful filming locations and must-see attractions to visit during your holiday.

 

Botallack Mine – Wheal Owles, on the Tin Coast, near St Just

The abandoned buildings, owned by the National Trust, were the perfect location for the Poldark family mines. The ruined engines houses, part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage site, are set on the side on the cliff with breath-taking views.

Read more at the National Trust website/Botallack.

 

Charlestown Harbour, St Austell

Built in 1792 by Charles Rashleigh, Charlestown is still a working harbour for china clay exports. Now privately owned the port has been used in well over one hundred shows and films. It’s just like stepping back in time as you walk along the flagstones and explore the 1939 Tall Ship “Kajsamaoor”.

Read more at Charlestown Port

 

 

Wheal Coates, St Agnes Head

Wheal Coates Engine House is perched on the side of the cliff at St Agnes over looking Chapel Porth. This is Poldark country at its best with purple heather, yellow gorse and miles of ocean.

Visit Wheal Coates’ National Trust website

 

Bodmin Moor

A great place to stop on your way to Falmouth. Used as the location for Ross Poldark’s cottage, Nampara, and the dramatic horseback scenes.

Read all the Poldark filming locations at the BBC website.

 

 

 

Poldark Tin Mine, Wendron, Helston

Although the Poldark Mine has not featured in the current series it was seen by millions all over the world when it featured in in the original BBC drama in 1970s. The only complete tin mine open for underground guided tours for a real atmosphere of times gone by.

Opening times and prices are available on the Poldark Mine website.

 

A windy day in St Ives

March 6, 2017 No Comments

A beautiful sunny day here in Cornwall – just a bit windy!  Nothing better than dressing up warm and getting yourself to the coastline to watch those powerful waves crash over the rocks.   Certainly blows the cobwebs away!

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Posted in: Days out

A Winter Picnic with Cornish Maid

February 9, 2017 No Comments

Whether it’s the weekend or you are on holiday, nothing beats that feeling of not having to get up at the crack of dawn! After a lazy morning, it’s time to head out the door for some much-needed time in the great outdoors…

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Falmouth is close to the beaches and the countryside and offers endless things for a family to do whatever the weather. Today it’s time to go walking in one of our favourite spots: the Helford river.

 

Just a short drive from Falmouth is Mawnan Smith: a quiet, friendly village, complete with all the amenities you might need. Nestled within the heart of the village is a lovely, friendly cafe called ‘Cornish Maid’. It’s the perfect spot to sit and relax with a hot brew and piece of cake while watching the village comings and goings. They also make ready-to-go picnic hampers, which suited us perfectly today. We love nothing more than a hearty picnic, especially one that’s been lovingly prepared for us. A picnic in winter you might say? As long as you’re wrapped up with appropriate weather gear, you can enjoy it whatever the weather. Somehow food always seems to taste better al fresco and after a long walk, feels very much deserved!

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A short hop down the road by car, we park at Bosveal, ‘The National Trust’ car park.

We tog up: hats, scarves, gloves, baby slings and raincoats (always prepare for every weather eventuality in Cornwall!). Daddy has the picnic, I have the baby and the eldest little nipper has disappeared off into the woods to search for bears!

 

Off we stomp – through the woods, past the cows, down a well-trodden path until we reach our favourite destination: Grebe beach!  We timed it just right – low tide – so there was plenty of space to run around, throw stones, build a sand-castle and find a good spot to set up camp for the afternoon. The ten minute walk is perfect for little legs.

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After our beach fun it was time to re-fuel and tuck into our picnic: a delicious hamper full of tasty and satisfying treats! The family hamper, for 2 adults and 2 children, more than filled us up with its delicious selection of fresh vegetarian sandwiches, tasty homemade cakes and Cornish biscuits. It took away the hassle of having to pack a picnic and the kids loved the surprise of not knowing what was in the hamper!

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After our filling picnic, it was time to sit back and relax while the kids occupied themselves. It is such a wonderful place to just stop and totally immerse ourselves in nature; the rugged tree-lined coastline running parallel to fields of cows, the gentle lapping of water, seaweed-covered rock pools and hundreds of pretty shells and pebbles along the shoreline to keep the kids occupied. “Treasure Mummy!’”, my four-year-old excitedly exclaims, when he discovers some glistening sea glass by his feet.

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We had a lovely afternoon spent in a beautiful place. That’s the beauty of Cornwall – no matter what time of year, if you go exploring, you can always find a peaceful spot to escape to. Each season brings its own, unique sights, smells and sounds. During the summer the stunning beaches would have you believe you’re in the mediterranean. Come the quieter winter months, the rugged beauty of steel-grey seas and deserted wind-swept beaches never fail to impress!

 

 

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