Bluebell Festival at Enys Garden

April 11, 2015 by becca.lazar No Comments

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Searching out fields of bluebells used to be a yearly activity in my family. In preparation for Helston’s Flora Day, we’d venture into the woods of the Penrose Estate to pick bunches of the wild flower in order to decorate the town. Coming across small forest glades with nothing but the company of birds and the sway of the breeze was always a pleasure; the tiny blue heads of the bells would stand, sparkling animations amidst the undergrowth.

Enys Garden, just outside Penryn, is renowned for its own Bluebell Festival and is probably one of the best places in the county, or even the country to see these beautiful and fragile flowers.

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Within the 30 acre gardens lie the open meadow known as Parc Lye, where the spring show of bluebells is breath taking, as well as ponds, where the waterwheel can be found; the flower garden, which is gradually being restored to its former glory; a New Zealand garden, which reflects J.D. Enys’s plant hunting interests, and many woodland areas, which show different types of planting including many remarkable trees.

According to the National Trust, bluebells, which require light and warmth coming into the forest floor to trigger growth, are normally at their height around late April or early May.

But it’s worth noting that due to recent mild winters, the bluebell season has started peaking early – sometimes even early April.

The common bluebell or Hyacinthoides non-scripta as it is less commonly known, grows from a bulb and is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act. Since 1998 it has been illegal to pick bluebells, with a triple figure fine for the picking of a single bulb.

The sweeping meadow of Parc Lye is carpeted with the tiny flowers, tossing their heads in the breeze. But it is not the only draw of the Gardens. Reputed to be Cornwall’s oldest garden, around 500 years old, there’s much to explore and photographers will have no problem whiling away hours here: each year the national press have a field day at Enys during the festival.

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Enys itself (the house) is being restored and lots of work has been done, including the removal of many rotten timbers. The model farm buildings and stable block are used to house a history room which has information about Enys, the gardens and the Enys family. These are is being extensively reorganised and is a work in progress.

Outside the festival access to Enys is limited to a few afternoons a week, but during the bluebell festival the garden is open all week.

 

Festival Opening Times
Saturday 2nd – Sunday 10th May.

During Bluebell festival week, Enys is open from 11am, last entry 4.30pm.

Admission
Adults: £5, Children 6-16: £2, Seniors: £4, Students: £2, Children under 5 free.
Dogs on leads are welcome in the gardens.

Getting there

From Bosinver, take the A390 to Truro and then the A39 (towards Falmouth). Once you pass the Norway Inn (on your right hand side) take the second left turn, signposted to Flushing, Restronguet and Mylor, and then the first right (look out for the sign for Enys Gardens). Carry straight on for just over a mile until you reach Enys Lodge and the entrance to the gardens. It will take approximately 40 minutes to get to Enys from Bosinver.The Enys Trust, St Gluvias, Penryn TR10 9LB
T: 01326 259885

 

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