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11 of the Best Cornish Country Pubs- with fires!

November 6, 2019 No Comments

As the nights draw in and the mercury creeps lower and lower, we’ve enjoyed being reacquainted with one of the loveliest experiences that winter brings, and apparently so have you!

Last week we asked our Instagram followers for recommendations of the best Cornish pubs with a warm fireside, and they sent us their top tips for places to warm up, perhaps after a long walk or a winter dip in the sea.

So without further ado, here are the best pubs in Cornwall with a cosy fireside, as chosen by you!

1. The Gurnards Head, Zennor (or thereabouts)

It’s just outside Zennor, but really the Gurnards head could be in the middle of nowhere. With dramatic cliffs to walk along before settling down, and accessed via one of the most beautiful roads in the UK, you’ll have much to discuss beside the fire.

2. The Pennycomequick, Falmouth

A firm Falmouth favourite with a wonderful fire and a perpetually jolly atmosphere. We love a little snooze in the fireside armchairs after one of their fantastic Sunday lunches, and the fact that our dogs can curl up beside the fire makes it feel even more like home…

3. The Star and Garter, Falmouth

Between us, the team at Cornish Holiday Cottages have spent a few evenings (and afternoons!) cocktail in hand beside this very same woodburner. After a walk along the harbour or a windy boat trip a visit to the Star and Garter in Falmouth is just the tonic…

4. The Ferryboat, Helford Passage

A walk along the Helford River just wouldn’t be complete without stopping into the lovely Ferryboat Inn. A beautifully decorated space with a super fire to warm any cold hands beside.

5. The Trelowarren Arms

Recommended by one of our local neighbors, and affectionately known as the ‘Trelly’, this is a real country pub if ever there was one!

6. The Punchbowl and Ladle, Penelewey

A gorgeous thatched country pub perfect for winding down after a walk around Trelissick, the National Trust property alongside the river Fal. This recently renovated watering hole is perfect for warming up during winter.

7. Harbour Inn, Porthleven

Renowned for bracing winds and crashing waves during the winter, there can be few places where a warm fireside is more necessary than Porthleven!

8. The Victory Inn, St Mawes

Tucked up along one of many opways and alleys in St Mawes, this secret gem might only be familiar to the curious among us. As the oldest pub in St Mawes, and with a cosy fireside to boot, this is a great place to pop into after a ferry ride over from Falmouth.

9. The Red Lion, Mawnan Smith

Luckily for us this 15th Century pub is a very short walk from our offices – we can see it’s thatched roof and chimney from our desks!

10. The Royal Standard, Flushing

A perfect place to stop off and warm up after a walk along the banks of the River Fal, with great food too!

11. The Pandora Inn, Restronguet

Popular throughout the summer for an incredible pontoon for dining at sunset, the Pandora Inn cannot be overlooked during the winter months. With flagstone floors and low beams, this traditional thatched Cornish pub is a cosy delight.

If there is somewhere extra special that we’ve missed, of you would like to join the conversation and let us know what you think, we’ve love to hear from you! Let us know on instagram – @cornishholidays

Restaurant Review – Rick Stein’s, Porthleven

February 19, 2016 No Comments

Interior

It’s the tail end of Hurricane Imogen when we venture down to Porthleven to celebrate a family wedding anniversary. And what’s a better way to celebrate such an occasion than heading down Rick Stein Porthleven? The latest addition to his Cornish Empire.

 

As we drive over the brow of the hill, undulating mountains of water blow in from the – a key reminder of the power of the ocean. Porthleven is the perfect place to sit and watch the elements battle it out. Maybe that’s why it features so heavily in the national newspapers at this time of year.

 
Rick Stein’s is set in the old white walled China Clay Building on the edge of the harbour and it’s a fantastic spot for a restaurant. As we approach, the outside is bathed in a bright blue light which looks a little out of place with the old stone harbour and more in keeping with an 80s cocktail bar. Entering the building, the first thing you see is the open kitchen, great if you’re the sort that likes to take a sneak peek at your food being prepared.

 
Having hung our coats up we enter the bar area, which is decked out with wooden barrels, quirky vintage light fittings and a smidgen more blue lighting. There’s also a painting of a naked surfer on the wall. It’s more than a little out of place.

 
The menu looks great. We know what to expect from Rick Stein by now: a mixture of British and Spanish dishes with the occasional safely Asian dish thrown in.

Sardines with an oat crumb

 

To start with there are Mounts Bay grilled sardines with an oat crumb which have a salty succulence paired with a mellowing oat crumb. I go for the classic fish soup with lashings of parmesan and a generous helping of crisp croutons. But the winner in the first course stakes goes to the fried calamari. Unlike the battered and bread crumbed varieties that are all the rage, these are served naked and on a bed of salad that’s very South East Asian in flavour: sweet, spicy and nutty all at the same time.

Fish and Chips

 

Into the main course, I opt for the boring; fish and chips. I know, I know, but there’s just something about a batter that’s truly crisp, the cod steaming away inside, with beef dripping chips and generous helpings of mushy peas and homemade tartar sauce. Sometimes it’s nice to keep it simple. Two of us have the Indonesian seafood curry. One telling us it’s quite spicy, the other that it’s a tad mild. It must be just right then. We also have the Gnocchi con Granseola, a Venetian dish pairing the gnocchi with spider crab and an Eastern Europe spiced sauce. I try and sample everything from everyone’s plate, all in the name of research, but not everyone is willing to part with their food.

Chocolate pavé

 

The dessert menu calls shortly after and there’s are some interesting selections to make. I go for a popcorn panna cotta with caramel shards. It’s texture is creamy, but even without the crunchy texture you associate with popcorn, the buttery flavour shines through. We also opt for the chocolate pavé, salted caramel ice cream and chocolate sauce. It’s a rich, gooey treat that goes down well with everyone.

 

As we leave, we’re once again bathed in the techno glow of the blue lighting. A reminder or the odd décor. But don’t let that put you off. The food has that unmistakable Stein’s quality to it – from the fish and chips through to the gnocchi – and gets the Cornish Holiday Cottages seal of approval.