Cornish Crabbing

April 4, 2016 by becca.lazar No Comments

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Crabs are bizarre little creatures. Their hard shells and snippy pincers should instill a sense of fear in children, but instead they’re endlessly fascinating, funny little things. From their rock pool habitats to their sideways crab walk, they are the main event when rock pooling and the star of coastal exploration.

Crabbing is a truly British Seaside activity that keeps the children occupied and is surprisingly addictive for the adults. It’s the stuff of childhood nostalgia: fun, daring and occasionally hair raising.

It’s more fun in the sun, but crabs can be caught all day long and all year round. All you need is a bucket, a line, something to weight it and some bait: we have it on good authority that crabs are bacon fiends, so a try tying some to the end of your line.

There are loads of great crabbing spot around our Cornish Holiday Cottages. The most well known spot is down at the Pandora Inn, at the end of their pontoon. Sit down and have a pint while the children occupy themselves with the crustaceans.
Crabs like to hide and they tend to live in places where there is plenty of cover from rocks, seaweed or other structures. Favourite hideouts include around piers and harbour walls, and on beaches with larger rocks and stones. So if you are anywhere that meets these conditions grab your bucket and bacon and start crabbing.

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Cornish Holiday Cottages’ Top Crabbing Locations

1.    The Harbour! There are many quays in Falmouth with perfect spots for doing a bit of crabbing.

2.    The Pandora Inn at Mylor, enjoy delicious food on the pontoon and you can crab while you wait. Crabbing lines and bait are sold inside.

3.    Castle Beach, get your hands dirty at low tide and enjoy some rock pooling.

4.    Flushing Quay, enjoy the views of Falmouth from Flushing.

5.    Mylor Quay, the perfect spot for sitting and relaxing by the quay.

6.    Helford Passage, the rocky beach is the perfect spot for crab hunting.

The most important thing to consider when crabbing is the safety and happiness of the crabs themselves. These handy tips from the good people at gonecrabbing.co.uk have created a great guide to crabbing aimed at children and this handy dos and don’ts list:

Don’t …. put too many crabs in one bucket. Stick to 10 per pail
Do …. add rocks and seaweed to the bucket to help replicate the crab’s natural environment and reduce stress
Don’t …. keep them all day long – return them to sea
Do …. change the water every 10 minutes to avoid asphyxiation. Only keep the crabs in sea water.
Don’t …. store your bucket in the sun
Don’t …. use a line with a hook on. Either tie your bacon on or use an old pair of tights/bit of net to hold your bacon in.
Do …. hold your crab correctly – gently hold it either side of its shell or pick it up with one finger on top of the shell and one finger underneath – avoiding the claws though!
Do …. remove any crabs which are fighting – male crabs tend to be more aggressive than the ladies.
Do …. remember to take all your equipment and rubbish home with you.
Do … go crabbing. When done responsibly, crabbing is an excellent way to introduce children to the marine ecology.

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