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Visit the real Poldark country

June 6, 2018 No Comments

The popular BBC1 show, Poldark, returns to our screens this Sunday, 10th June at 9pm.  The series showcases some of Cornwall’s most spectacular rugged landscapes, stunning beaches and historic buildings.

If it’s just too tempting and you feel the yearn to follow in Ross and Demelza’s footsteps, firstly call our friendly team to help you find the perfect base for your break, then read on for our handy list of beautiful filming locations and must-see attractions to visit during your holiday.

 

Botallack Mine – Wheal Owles, on the Tin Coast, near St Just

The abandoned buildings, owned by the National Trust, were the perfect location for the Poldark family mines. The ruined engines houses, part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage site, are set on the side on the cliff with breath-taking views.

Read more at the National Trust website/Botallack.

 

Charlestown Harbour, St Austell

Built in 1792 by Charles Rashleigh, Charlestown is still a working harbour for china clay exports. Now privately owned the port has been used in well over one hundred shows and films. It’s just like stepping back in time as you walk along the flagstones and explore the 1939 Tall Ship “Kajsamaoor”.

Read more at Charlestown Port

 

 

Wheal Coates, St Agnes Head

Wheal Coates Engine House is perched on the side of the cliff at St Agnes over looking Chapel Porth. This is Poldark country at its best with purple heather, yellow gorse and miles of ocean.

Visit Wheal Coates’ National Trust website

 

Bodmin Moor

A great place to stop on your way to Falmouth. Used as the location for Ross Poldark’s cottage, Nampara, and the dramatic horseback scenes.

Read all the Poldark filming locations at the BBC website.

 

 

 

Poldark Tin Mine, Wendron, Helston

Although the Poldark Mine has not featured in the current series it was seen by millions all over the world when it featured in in the original BBC drama in 1970s. The only complete tin mine open for underground guided tours for a real atmosphere of times gone by.

Opening times and prices are available on the Poldark Mine website.

 

Porthtowan Minehouses

March 14, 2016 No Comments

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You might find it hard to believe, but spring is just around the corner. Despite the mild chill that’s still in the air, we’ve already been taking advantage of the bright sunny days that are being sent our way. Last weekend, when the grey clouds lifted we took ourselves to Porthtowan, a small town nestled within some of the most stunning coastline that our fine county has to offer.

The remains of the mining industry dot the landscape as you drive towards Porthtowan. Like scars on the landscape, chimneys stand like bare trees on the hillsides. It’s an area steeped in mining heritage.

 

Porthtowan itself fighting against the tumbling dunes that continually blow through the town. As we got closer to the car park we found half the road and pavement completely covered with sand. It’s all part of its charm.

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On the beach families and dog walkers stretched their legs and splashed around in the sand.
But our mission wasn’t to stroll on the beach. We we’re heading East, up the steep assent from the beach and onto the coastal path.

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As we came to the brow of the next headland and stood high above Chapel Porth beach, the reason for our visit made itself known above.
The remains of Wheal Coates, or more accurately Towanroath engine house, will be familiar as the image that graces a thousand postcards, but nothing beats the real thing.
Wheal Coates mine was opened in 1802 and miners worked in its tunnels up to 1889. Towanroath Engine House was built in 1872 to drain the seeping sea water from the 600 feet deep mine shaft.
What if this was the view from your work window?
In reality, the 138 men of the mine were working in tough conditions. The fragile mineshafts extended far beyond the shore line. As storms raged, miners could hear huge boulders being dragged across the seabed which was only feet above their heads.

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Next, we took a short scramble up the hill to two more engine houses: the Stamps and Whim engine houses. They were used to hoist and crush tin ore from the shaft below. As you walk around this site the remains of an old boiler pond can be seen. There’s also a calciner, where the ore was roasted at hight temperatures to drive out impurities – in this case arsenic.
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As we turned around to head back to Porthtowan we caught sight of the ocean spray rising over the coastline (and met a friendly dog bounding towards us.
On our return we tumbled into Porthtowan’s famous Blue Bar for a much needed refreshment. Roll on the rest of spring!

 

Springtime Guided Walks

February 22, 2016 No Comments

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Springtime holidays in Cornwall are an opportunity to explore the county during a period of growth and rebirth. It also brings the Falmouth Spring Festival, which runs from the 10th to the 28th of March. One of the best thing about the festival is the abundance of guided walks on offer through out the festivities.
Seashore Foraging – Thursday 10th March only
Starting at Gyllyngvase Beach and taking in 2 miles of coastline with some rock-pool scrambling, this tour will teach you how to identify edible plants and forage safely and legally. There will also be some prepared wild nibbles to start you off.

The session starts at 10.45am and lasts for an hour and a half. It costs £35 for adults and £25 concessions. For information call Rachel on 01736 361454 or email rachel@wildwalks-southwest.co.uk
Through Falmouth Town – 10th, 16th, 22nd March
This one and a half hour walk through the centre of Falmouth is led by renowned guide, Paul Simmons, who runs walkitcornwall. This tour will lead you through 350 years of Falmouth in an informative and entertaining manner, taking in the odd ghost and cannibal tale along the way.

The walk begins at the Maritime Museum at 5pm. Call 07714084644 or email info@walkitcornwall.co.uk
Poldark’s Falmouth – 11th, 19th, 25th, 26th March
This tour is bound to be popular so booking is advised. Winston Graham’s Poldark novels dealt with smuggling, shipwrecks, riots and the packet ships of Falmouth. The walk links these themes to specific sites in Falmouth.

The walk begins at the Maritime Museum at 5pm. Call 07714084644 or email info@walkitcornwall.co.uk
Explore Mawnan’s Coast – 12th, 19th March
Take in the Helford river, woodlands, hidden valleys, historic trackways and the SW Coastal Path with Explore in Cornwall’s Steve Crummay. There’s a wealth of history and wildlife to explore in this 3.5 mile walk.

Starting at Mawnan Church car park, the walk begins at 10am and takes approximately 4.5 hours. Tickets cost £5 or £2.50 for concessions. Contact 01736 740234 or email info@exploreincornwall.co.uk

Helford and Gillan Creek – 13th, 19th March
Across the river from Cornish Holiday Cottages, Gillan Creek sits in a relatively unexplored part of the Helford Estuary. On this walk you’ll be taking in ancient western oak woodland looking for a wide range of wildlife in stunning coastal and estuarine habitats. There will be otters and wintering bird life to look out for in the river, creeks and coast.

Starting at Helford Car park, the walk begins at 10am and takes approximately 4.5 hours. Tickets cost £5 or £2.50 for concessions. Contact 01736 740234 or email info@exploreincornwall.co.uk
Free Nordic Walking Trial – 18th March
Nordic Walking is a full body, vigorous walking experience using poles. You build up rhythm linking the swing of your arms to smooth pelvic motions and stride length. If that sounds like your idea of fun, then there’s a free try out at Trelissick Gardens with an INWA Instructor.

Starts at 11am. Contact Kate Jackson on 07540 478919 or email walkkernow@gmail.com
Campus Critters Walk – 19th March
Explore the biodiversity of Penryn Campus under the guidance of experts on bird, mammel, insect and plant identification. If the spring weather permits the guides will also attempt some live animal captures as well.

This free walk starts at the reception of Penryn Campus at 7.30am. They’ll even provide you with a warm beverage. Contact Caitlin Kight on 01326 255166 or email c.r.kight@exeter.ac.uk
Ghost Walk Of Falmouth – 27th March
Led by author and ghost expert Ian Addicoat, this spooky walk takes in Falmouth locations that are steeped in ghostly tales. Addicoat has appeared on GMTV and Mot Haunted, so it’s a good opportunity to hear through provoking stories from an entertaining guide.

This evening walk starts at 8.30pm and leaves from the Maritime Museum. It costs £6 for adults and

Cornish Days Out: Trelissick Gardens [Feock, Truro]

October 20, 2015 No Comments

 

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The grounds of Trelissick Gardens will be familiar to those of you who have moseyed up the river Fal while staying with Cornish Holiday Cottages. The vast grounds of the estate arch their way down into the valley, dipping their toes into the water next to The King Harry Ferry. Trelissick house stands proud at the top of the headland.

Since last summer, and for the first time in Trelissick’s history, the historic house has been opened up to the public. A 17th Century manor house, peeking inside is an eye opening look into a house in transition. Whilst there are beautiful inlays, antiques galore and historic china decorated with rhododendrons, it is a house that has been, and is still lived in by the Copeland family. For those wishing to delve into the history of the estate there are knowledgeable volunteers on hand who are keen to tell you about the family and the house. As we enter we are told of their famous Spode China business and how the flowers from the gardens were used as patterns for their products.

After wandering through the house we exist through a high ceiling, art-deco conservatory, facing the river. It’s the sort of room you can imagine whiling away lazy summer afternoons in.

Entering the grounds themselves, the first thing to welcome us is a small, multi-sensory garden loaded with herby scents and smells. It’s a perfect hands on introduction and you are positively encouraged get tactile with the plants. We leave with the almondy vanilla smells of clemantis flammula clinging sweetly to our fingers.

The gardens are packed with azaras and photinias and over 350 hydrangeas – many planted before World War II. The meandering pathways are bordered by a mixture of exotic palms and shade giving trees and vegetation designed to give interest all year round. If you venture over a curving wooden bridge you will find a dominating cryptomeria japonica that was planted in 1898.

A cornucopia of apples greet us in the orchard. It’s a quite peaceful place and possibly my favourite part of the gardens. In the corner sits an ancient apple press, 6th wide. The orchard is home to more than 70 varieties of apple, including Pig’s Noses and Chacewater Longstems and they are ripe for the picking, some having already dropped to the ground.

At the beginning of October, Trelissick will be having a whole weekend dedicated to those apples. There will be info on a range of appley subjects and the ancient press will be in action! So there’s a good chance you could sample some of this year’s fresh apple juice.

Being a National Trust property you initially pay for parking and there are some fantastic woodland walks in the area that are perfect for dogs and family adventuring, if you don’t want to pay for the gardens themselves.

We definitely recommend their café. The home-cooked food changes seasonally and is good value for money: their sausage and bean stew is definitely a lunch time winner. Dogs are welcome with water bowls positioned next to almost every table.

 

 

 

Rough Tor Walk on Bodmin Moor

January 8, 2015 No Comments

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It was a glittering, sunlit day on Bodmin Moor. The light had a wintery, low-lying quality and the ground was crisp with frost and ice.  We were seeking something away from the coast, but equally as impressive as the ragged cliffs and golden sands. As it is, I think the moorland walk between Rough Tor and Brown Willy is just as dramatic a scene.

An hour’s drive from most of our Cornish Holiday Cottages, Rough Tor (pronounced ‘row’, as in argument) rises dramatically in front of you, dominating the landscape before you are even out of the car. At its top a scar of stark granite rose from the earth dramatically, enticing us towards it.

The ground lay crisp at our feet; the puddles still iced over in the winter sun as we crossed the stream onto the moorland and spotted the stone circles of Bronze Age farmhouses nestled amidst the long grass. Further up half wild ponies fed and played. We began to feel the wind clawing around the tors.

With hats firmly in place and our coats wrapped around us, we made our way up the wide expanse of the moor, up to the stacks of balanced rocks at the top. From there we clambered up on to the top of the tor. The view was beautifully panoramic. In the distance were Port Isaac and the sea, with a clay works mapped out in the near distance. All around lay the wild grass lands, forests and hills. Stunning. But on the other side of Rough Tor lay another challenge: Brown Willy.

We made our descent into the next valley, bouncing on the exposed rock as we went. At the bottom we negotiated the small stream and up into the medieval farmland surrounding Brown Willy, squelching in the mud as we went. Ascending the north side, the ground was still delightfully frozen, even at one in the afternoon and we took delight in cracking the surface with our feet. I can only imagine what the moorland looks like in the summer, buzzing with wildlife and teeming with the blues and pinks of wild flowers.

Rising above the hill is a pyramid of stone adding extra height. Standing at 1,378 feet, Brown Willy is the highest point on Bodmin Moor and Cornwall itself. This is where we caught our breath.

The walk is a five-mile round trip back to the car and by the time we got there we were more than a little hungry. A short distance from the Tor, near the village of Alternun, is the local pub and eatery The Rising Sun, which serves unpretentious, yet and tasty food – the scallops with elderflower dressing starter is a generous portion and an interesting take on the dish: this was the perfect end to the day.

Slowly, we drove west, back towards home and were greeted by a wonderful winter sunset. The hills glowed red and the sun was an ember, lingering on the horizon.

For a map of the walk with directions got to http://www.iwalkcornwall.co.uk/walk/roughtor_and_brown_willy

 

 

 

Mylor Headland Walk

April 18, 2014 No Comments

Just enjoyed a beautiful walk from Mylor Quay around the headland stopping off for some refreshment and a relaxing rest at the Pandora Inn.  Including our many stops to enjoy the fabulous views the whole walk back to the village took less than three hours.  Ideal if you are staying in one of our village properties such as Acorn Cottage, Trehovel or Fox Cottage (coming soon to CHC)

 

It’s Doggy Competition time here at Cornish Holiday Cottages!

October 17, 2013 1 Comment

Here at Cornish Holiday Cottages we’ve been celebrating now the dogs are allowed on all the beaches again; although not as much as the dogs, they’ve been having a brilliant time running around on the sand.

Cornwall is very dog friendly all through the year, with dogs welcome in most local pubs and a wonderful choice of coastal path for walking. With just under a third of visitors to the county being dog owners, we’re proud to say we welcome dogs, nearly 50% of our cottages are pet friendly. Winter is one of the best times of the year to visit Cornwall, with vast expanses of sand to enjoy peacefully on your own and an incredible amount of pubs selling hearty local food. What better than a cosy Cornish cottage to snuggle up in front of the fire with a mug of hot chocolate and a very sleepy dog by your feet after all that exploring!

To mark the occasion we’ve decided to have a little competition! We want to see photo’s of your dog on holiday here in Cornwall, it could be a photo of them enjoying the beach, or relaxing at the local watering hole. Our 5 favourites will win a pack of Hungry Hector dog treats! Made locally here in Cornwall, and full of lots of nutrients for your furry friend.

Click here to go to our facebook page

Or email your photo to info@cornishholidaycottages.net

Don’t forget to put your name, and your dog’s name with the photo. You’ve got till midnight on the 31st October!

 

Dog Friendly Falmouth

 

Here are some of our top suggestions for things to do when visiting Cornwall with canine companions in winter:
Trebah Gardens, Falmouth

1. Why not visit Trebah Gardens?   Beautiful sub-tropical plants, treelined walkways, a hidden koi carp pond and a monet-esque bridge all make this garden truly magical.  A private beach, fantastic cafe and a genuinely dog friendly welcome make this the best day out. Finished off with a brilliant shop selling local produce, to buy your Christmas presents. Click here for more information on Trebah Gardens.

Rosemullion Head

2. There’s nearly 300 miles of coastline to choose from in Cornwall, but one of our favourite bits has to be Rosemullion Head. The path from Maenporth to the Helford is a stunning stretch of coastline with hidden coves, all kinds of wildlife and beautiful wild flowers, and can be enjoyed by boat or foot. It’s perfect for a bit of swimming for both you and your dog, and you won’t have a shortage of sticks to throw! Rosemullion is perfect for a walk to explore the Cornish countryside and why not take a picnic to enjoy on one of the many benches along the way.

Gyllyngvase Beach Cafe

3. When in Cornwall, you must visit the beach!  Of course there are enough dog friendly beaches to go to one on every day of your stay but we recommend an hour at Gyllyngvase Beach.  Run the dogs on the beach and then follow the short cliff path walk to Swanpool Beach.  Walk around the lake and back to Gyllynvase Cafe for a much deserved brunch or Cornish cream tea! Click here to see the Gylly Beach Cafe (Gyllyngvase Beach is dog friendly from October 1st to Easter day)

Falmouth Castle

4. Teach the dogs a bit about history with a trip around an English Heritage property.  We recommend walking around the point to Pendennis Castle in Falmouth where you can see the castle Henry VIII built and learn about the history of our forefathers.  Dogs will love exploring the moat and meeting all the other dogs along the way, and even in Winter, you can usually get an ice cream! If not, why not pick up some fish and chips and drive up there to admire the view, the dogs will love it (the fish and chips we mean, not so much the view!) Click here for more on Pendennis Castle

 

View our selection of dog friendly cottages here.  For further information or advice on things to do with your dog, contact us on info@cornishholidaycottages.net

 

To check which beaches in Cornwall are dog friendly and when please click here.